St John's Wort
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Vervain, also known as Verbena
ST JOHN'S WORT-VERVAIN
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St John’s Wort has also been used for more than 2000 years ! St John’s Wort was
also thought to be magic: it was used to ward off fevers and colds, keep mental
illness at bay and cure melancholy !
It was also used to heal animals bites and wounds, as well as digestive problems, ulcers. It may also ease fibrositis, sciatica, and rheumatic pain.

For 20 years, St John’s Wort has been used in Europe to promote nerve repair,
giving it a place in the treatment of neuralgia, anxiety, tension, and similar
problems. It may even be used to treat mild depressive states, thanks to a sedative and pain reducing effect.

All over Europe, people swear by it. Already many Americans have made it a
triumph, making sales increase by 2800 % between 1999 and 2000.

Infused with these herbs, Effervé is a "magical" experience !

The red sap of this plant resembles blood. "If anyone trod on the plant after sunset a fairy-house would appear and carry them about. Used on Midsummer, when picked under certain conditions and while uttering certain words, for divination" (Miller - St. John's Wort).

Also known by the Italian name of "devil-chaser," St. John's Wort was considered potent against faeries (Britannica Online - Fairy), and was thought to be able to strip a witch of her will. St. John's wort "was in great request, and hence it was extensively worn as an amulet, especially in Germany of St. John's Eve, a time when not only witches by common report peopled the air, but evil spirits wandered about on no friendly errand" (Thiselton-Dyer 62). Sir Walter Scott gave a rhyme spoken by a demon lover who could not approach a girl because she was carrying St. John's Wort and vervain: If you would be true love mine, Throw away John's Wort and Verbein (K. Briggs 346).
VERVAIN
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Vervain, also known as, Verbena, has been used for centuries !
Vervain is a "magic herb" par excellence ! Matthiole, the 16th century botanist,
wrote that "magicians lose their senses and their reason with that herb. They say that the ones who rubbed themselves with vervain, would get all they want, and they
thought this herb healed fever and every illness…"
The Romans used it to make love potions, to predict the future and to protect
themselves from spirits…

Nowadays, Vervain is recommended for many digestive complaints, fevers, ulcers,
migraines, and rheumatism problems Europeans are very keen on verbena infusion.

Witches were thought to have used vervain liberally. For Italian witches, vervain was
considered sacred to Diana. Vervain was a necessary part to many an ointment,
brew, and love philtre, and was also necessary in the preparation of a hand of glory.
Vervain was also associated with invisibility (Guiley 1989 349). "Vervain was said to give strength ('tough as iron', 'hard as steel') and to act as an aphrodisiac (Rätsch 172).

Vervain was also considered a "lightning plant" and was sacred to Thor. It was also
sacred to the Druids, "and was only gathered by them, 'when the dog-star arose,
from unsunned spots'" (Thiselton-Dyer 56). Vervain is also known as Dragon's Claw
(in Scotland), Common Vervain, Verbena, Simpler's Joy, Holy Herb, Tears of Isis,
Tears of Juno, Persephonion, Demetria, Frog-foot, Verbinaca, Peristerium, Juno's
Tears, Mercury's Moist Blood, Pigeon's Grass, Columbine, and Sagmina (Miller -Vervain).

Vervain is an herb diametrically associated with Christianity and with witchcraft.
Early Christians referred to vervain as "herb-of-the-cross" because they believed it
was used to staunch Jesus' blood as he was being crucified. Because of this Christian association, vervain was long said to work as an effective charm against incubi, demons, evil spells, and witches. During the Middle Ages, vervain was hung in homes, over stable doors, among crops, and around people's necks.

"The Germans used vervain as an amulet during peace treaties and to protect against the evil eye and the temptations of witches" (Rätsch 172).
Sir Walter Scott gave a rhyme spoken by a demon lover who could not approach a
girl because she was carrying St. John's Wort and vervain: If you would be true love mine, Throw away John's Wort and Verbein (K. Briggs 346).

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